Author Archive

Apr
27

In the Press…

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (2)

Please review our Press Release: Cool Garden Things.com Ends Life In The Sandbox For Cool Garden Decor.

Originally posted 2008-10-16 23:05:02. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Categories : Garden Decor
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Brief History Of Landscape and Landscaping by Paul Zayer

Shaping the landscape or landscaping if you prefer refers to any activity or process that alters the features of a piece of land in a visible way, such as living elements of flora and fauna, landforms, such as ground elevation and shape or bodies of water, human elements, like structures and fences, and abstract factors such as elements that can manage the lighting and /or weather conditions.

Landscaping is a highly aesthetic landscape art form that requires a volume of useful knowledge having to do with plant knowledge, practical applications and working with many tools. It could be stated that the most early landscaper was the Greek philosopher Thales of Miletus, who spent a great deal of time pondering the nature and various scopes of landscaping.

Where most early landscapers said that true landscaping modifies plants or fields directly, like in the activities of cultivation of food crops, Thales did not approve of this explanation of  landscaping or shaping the landscape, arguing that any aspect of the physical world affecting a person’s visual perception of an area of land was a proper application of landscaping. Landscape and landscaping are all around us each and everyone of us.

Both Plato and Aristotle had approved Thales philosophical modeling involving landscape and landscaping, as well as how his theories can be applied somewhere else in philosophical exploration. G.E. Moore also talked about Thales in several of his own philosophical works explaining how philosophical discourse and inquiry has led to the very true forms of human improvement and understanding.

Then in the 1800s many philosophers debated if visual beauty could even be considered a required goal of landscaping or managing landscape, though by the years 2000 a lot of western philosophical thinkers had decided to reject the idea of an objective aesthetic standard for any variety of art, whether architecture or landscaping

Since the later half of the 20th century, professional landscapers and practitioners have experimented with impressive visual landscape sites that since became generally accepted as being a category of landscaping, at least in the occident.

More often than not we do not appreciate the quiet beauty of great landscaping arrangements. In our busy life the time to look around and appreciate the beauty around us has become a luxury. Next time you go out of your office on a nice sunny day, why don’t you sit quietly on a park bench and appreciate the landscaping around you.

This well known author is an Internet expert and surely enjoys sharing his information with other people. Discover more now about Landscaping and about Landscape and Landscaping guide at his web site landscapeandlandscaping.com

Article Source: http://articlecrux.com

Originally posted 2009-01-04 14:38:36. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Categories : Landscaping
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Apr
27

Put Your Lawn On a Diet

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

flower heartby: Doug Green

Those wonderful green lawns many homeowners care about so much can be made much more healthy if we put them on a diet. Overfeeding causes as many problems with lawns as it does with people. Fat lawns are not healthy lawns. Rather than go on about this problem, let me simply tell you about the research at the University of Guelph.

Researcher Christopher Hallfound there was a way to promote health in the lawn by the frequency of the fertilizer application and the amount of fertilizer applied. According the Hall, fertilizer for lawns should be applied three times per year. One quarter of the fertilizer being applied should be applied in early summer, (not early spring) when the ground warms up and the grass is beginning to really grow. Another quarter is applied in late summer, around the middle of August when the fall rains are promoting growth, and the last half of the fertilizer is applied at the end of November to fatten up the roots for winter survival. This application rate was found to create a much denser turf than applications at other times all species and cultivars of grass. It was particularly effective on perennial rye grass and tall fescues.

The next question is how much food does the lawn need? Chris Hall at Guelph found that the turf did better if only 2 pounds of Nitrogen per 1000 square feet was used over the whole season. From the above paragraph, it can be seen that 1/4 pound is applied in early summer, 1/4 pound in late summer and 1 full pound in late November for the healthiest, thickest lawn.

Overfeeding produces thatch and weakened grass that is susceptible to pests and disease. It is also more costly. So, put your lawn on a diet for a better lawn.

Source: Articlecity.com

About The Author

Doug Green, an award winning garden author with 7 published books answers gardening questions in his free newsletter at www.gardening-tips-perennials.com.

Originally posted 2009-08-25 13:20:35. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Categories : Garden Decor
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Author: nlwest21
Poison ivy – also best-known as toxicodendron radicans – is a kind of plant that is regarded to be apart of the Anacardiaceae family. Many of us learned about this plant when we were children and were taught to keep as far away from it as we possibly could. Those of us who did not listen to the rule soon discovered about the rash that it would induce and which would leave us in pain for a week.  This plant is not really an ivy – but is instead a wooden vine that can to develop the content urushiol. This is a kind of skin irritant that causes the rash to come out on anyone who tries to feel it. This rash can make the person incredibly itchy. It must be dealt with unique creams.  You will be able to recognize the poison ivy plant by its common ‘leaves of three’. All of the blades are almond shaped and is the one feature that truly separates it from different plants. The plant will likewise have berries that are a gray-white color and which are consumed by birds during the winter months.  The younger plants will have light green leaves and as they mature this color will turn into a dark green. The blades are between 3 to 12 centimeters long and will have a few teeth on the edges of it. Along the vine you will observe that the leaves are grown clustered together.   These plants will never be discovered growing in desert or arid regions. Rather they are ofttimes developing in the woody areas. This is why they are oftentimes tricky to spot because they have the ability to merge in well with the plants that surround them.  People find it very tricky to do away with the  poison ivy plant  because it has the power to produce both sexually and vegetatively. The vines will push out adventitious roots or the plant will plainly spread from the root crowns. The seeds has the ability to be distributed by the animals in the area after they have consumed parts of it and then had it come out of their system.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/gardening-articles/best-way-to-identify-poison-ivy-894625.html

About the Author:
Knowing everything you can about  Poison Ivy  will help you to  Treat  it properly.

Photograph courtesy of Charles M. Wrenn III at www.morguefile.com

Originally posted 2009-04-30 14:05:07. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Categories : Gardening
Comments (1)

Here is a very informative and interesting video I found on you tube, I hope you enjoy this!

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To prune clematis, cut back the plant after the flowering is over to about a foot from the ground. Avoid trimming clematis more than one-third each year with tips from a sustainable gardener in this free video on gardening.

Originally posted 2009-05-04 06:00:57. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Categories : Gardening
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I think this garden lady has some good information, and she does not beat around the bush-but gets right down to what you want to know!
–GartenGrl–

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Making a butterfly garden involves growing leafy plants for caterpillars and planting fluffy blooms like leatrice, lavender and Black-Eyed-Susan. Create a butterfly-friendly garden with tips from a…

Originally posted 2009-06-08 07:00:58. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Categories : Gardening
Comments (2)

Walnut tree
Photo by cizauskas
A few years ago I lived in an old victorian house in Ann Arbor, Michigan that had a handful of stately old 100 foot tall Walnut trees (juglans regia). I quickly discovered that there were a number of plants that simply died or started to die as soon as I planted them under that tree – petunias, peonies, roses, impatiens to name just an unfortunate few. I was beginning to think perhaps I was not as good a gardener as I thought myself to be.

After asking around a bit I discovered that walnut trees are considered a gardening challenge because there are a number of plants that simply can not survive under them. This is due to a poisonous substance that leaches from the walnut trees called juglone-I sure would not be eating any veggies or herbs grown near or under a walnut tree( I heard somewhere that it was an ingredient in rat poison many years ago…not sure if that is true or just some kind of urban legend). So if you have hanging plants under a giant and elegant tree that keep dying and you do not know why, try looking up to see if that tree is a walnut tree. If it is then that is one garden problem you can consider solved! Read More→

Originally posted 2009-12-16 16:57:36. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Comments (5)
clipped from www.coolgardenthings.com
If you are looking for Cool Bird Feeders, FirePots™, FireFountains™, Gazing Balls, Gazing Ball Stands, Hummingbird Feeders or Garden Statuary, you my dear, are in the right place. Just browse for a moment and you will see that our garden decor selection is top notch! Have fun shopping. Note: This is not your typical garden decor store. We are only offering the “Coolest” outdoor home and garden decor and accessories for You, our clients.
blog it

Originally posted 2008-10-13 15:05:56. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Categories : Accessories
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Apr
27

How to Grow Avocado

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

avocado shells and seeds
Photo by bionicteaching
by: Hans Dekker
Fruit gardening and vegetable gardening is a very exciting venture. Growing Avocado’s was one of the challenges I took on as a hobby fruit and vegetable gardener. When you are not an inhabitant of state with a tropical climate you can grow avocado’s in containers.

avocado seed
Photo by silencematters

So, if you’re a fan of the avocado, chances are you already know how to grow avocado plants. Although the avocado tree is a tropical plant that thrives only in zones 9, 10, and 11, many gardeners grow avocado plants indoors, they grow it as a houseplant. Avocado plants are typically started from the seed in the center of the fruit. Many gardeners begin their avocado plants by piercing the seed with toothpicks and then suspending it (pointed end up) over a glass, vase, or jar of water. You can keep the water sweet by adding some charcoal in the bottom of your container. In two to six weeks, if the seed germinates, you should have a young plant, ready to pot. However, not all avocado seeds will germinate in this way. If your seed hasn’t sprouted in six weeks, toss it out and try again. Read More→

Originally posted 2010-01-08 11:09:14. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Apr
27

Native Plants In Late Summer

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

Here is another great video that discussed some excellent native plant choices that you can add to your native plant garden.

–GartenGrl

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And then of course there’s the Purple Cone Flower just finishing up this time of the year but nonetheless spectacular. And just look at this exuberant display of Black-Eyed Susans. It just seems like the more you turn up the heat, the better they perform. These showy flowers are particularly suited as companions to many of the native grasses which move so gracefully in the wind. .

Originally posted 2009-06-01 07:00:39. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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  • Heat Index: 52°F;
  • Wind Chill: 49°F;
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Categories : Garden Decor, Gardening
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