Archive for Garden Decor

written by Rebecca Rambal

Poppy in a garden
Photo by Leonard John Matthews

When you think of Feng Shui, you mainly associate it with the home or the office, rearranging the furniture and surrounding yourself with objects that attract good luck. However it is not only indoors that can be designed using Feng Shui. You can also use it to create the perfect garden environment.

If a garden is part of your property, Feng Shui should be incorporated into it. That will really help to bring you the best results. We all like our gardens to look impressive and beautiful. It allows us to appreciate our environment a lot more and it helps to release positive energy that helps us flourish. Feng Shui gives us the tools needed to create the most positive outside environment and the best part is that you don’t need a huge garden to use Feng Shui arrangements.

Incorporating Feng Shui into the Garden

~ Orange Tree ~
Photo by ViaMoi

One of the main factors that you have to take into account when it comes to Feng Shui is that clutter is always a bad thing. This also applies to the garden. If you have a lot of clutter outside of your doorway you won’t attract good energy. Make sure that the entrance to your home looks welcoming and tidy. Also make sure you clean up once Winter is gone. The cold weather and the snow will cause leaves to stick to your lawn and in your flower beds. Once you have tidied everything away, you can truly start to incorporate Feng Shui into the garden.

If you want to plant trees in your garden, aim to plant them at the sides and around the back of your garden. Don’t plant them too close to your home as, although they are fantastic producers of positive energy, they can overshadow the home and look a little too imposing if placed too close. There should always be plenty of natural light shining into your home, so don’t place anything in the garden that will block out the light. Read More→

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Apr
27

How to Grow Avocado

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

avocado shells and seeds
Photo by bionicteaching
by: Hans Dekker
Fruit gardening and vegetable gardening is a very exciting venture. Growing Avocado’s was one of the challenges I took on as a hobby fruit and vegetable gardener. When you are not an inhabitant of state with a tropical climate you can grow avocado’s in containers.

avocado seed
Photo by silencematters

So, if you’re a fan of the avocado, chances are you already know how to grow avocado plants. Although the avocado tree is a tropical plant that thrives only in zones 9, 10, and 11, many gardeners grow avocado plants indoors, they grow it as a houseplant. Avocado plants are typically started from the seed in the center of the fruit. Many gardeners begin their avocado plants by piercing the seed with toothpicks and then suspending it (pointed end up) over a glass, vase, or jar of water. You can keep the water sweet by adding some charcoal in the bottom of your container. In two to six weeks, if the seed germinates, you should have a young plant, ready to pot. However, not all avocado seeds will germinate in this way. If your seed hasn’t sprouted in six weeks, toss it out and try again. Read More→

Originally posted 2010-01-08 11:09:14. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Apr
27

Native Plants In Late Summer

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

Here is another great video that discussed some excellent native plant choices that you can add to your native plant garden.

–GartenGrl

YouTube Preview Image

And then of course there’s the Purple Cone Flower just finishing up this time of the year but nonetheless spectacular. And just look at this exuberant display of Black-Eyed Susans. It just seems like the more you turn up the heat, the better they perform. These showy flowers are particularly suited as companions to many of the native grasses which move so gracefully in the wind. .

Originally posted 2009-06-01 07:00:39. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Categories : Garden Decor, Gardening
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When I had you / Dok sam te imao
Photo by lepiaf.geo (better off slipping into blur)
In November in Michigan it is time to put your garden to sleep for the winter. There are perhaps three different approaches to this and each one has its advantages and disadvantages to consider.

The “tidy clean-up” basically cuts every plant-except woody herbs and shrubs- to with-in an inch of it’s life and removes every ounce of dead plant matter with-in a mile. This method looks very clean. Reminiscent of your living room after the maid service leaves. This technique will ensure that very few diseased leaves are left behind to infect next years plants.It may also help hinder the slug and pest population. The cons of this technique outweigh the pros, because by removing all plant matter you have also removed all the vital nutrients the decomposing plant matter provides. You have also removed the winter protection and that plant matter provides for roots. Which means that you will have to add expensive fertilizers and amendments to your garden to make up for this. More expensive and less healthy for your garden this technique is not the best approach to a healthy garden. Read More→

Originally posted 2009-12-03 15:47:47. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Apr
27

Weed Watch Spring 2009

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (2)

Alright people!  I’m not going to tip-toe around this important garden issue. Spring is coming and it’s time to start planning ahead for the weeds that are coming with it. The invasive ones are my biggest concern. And this spring I want you all to keep an eye out for HORSETAIL (Equisetum arvense).
horse tail weed
The first time you saw Horsetail you may have innocently thought to yourself…Hmmm that looks like an interesting plant. Maybe you even foolishly thought to add it to your garden! Oh such folly! Perhaps you are one of those crazy gardeners like my father who likes to pit invasive against invasive *SIGH*

Well, if that is the case you may now unfortunately have it, and you probably want to get rid of it…LOL!  Good luck with that!  All I can recommend based on asking other gardeners, and from personal experience fighting it in the garden is to:  MULCH it, WEED it and SPRAY it with Round UP.

Why is this plant so difficult to get rid of?  Because it has SPORES people!  We are talking invisible microscopic prehistoric, grows in volcano SPORES.  So I would not ignore it if it appears…Pull it out…Pull it out….Pull it out! Luckily it pulls easily, except you are not going to get the entire root, as it lies like 6 feet underground akin to some kind of alien mother ship…Lurking …

What should you do? It would seem the thing to do is to make your garden less like a volcan0 and more like a jungle.  So fertilize, enrich the soil, mulch, and weed. I have found that you can plant taller plants near it to hide it and try to choke it out. Maybe my father’s method of invasive vs. invasive isn’t so far off the mark-No! Avoid invasives!  Try NATIVE (which sometimes behave a bit invasive if you ask me-which you didn’t)

Well, enough said for the moment. GartenGrl out.

Originally posted 2009-02-04 15:22:03. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Author: Jay Ruppel
One of the best additions you can make to your back yard is a fire pit.  People are naturally attracted to fire, and there is a long history going back to the days of bonfireprehistory of people gathering around a fire to exchange stories and enjoy each other’s company.

This concept is being brought forward to today’s culture with the fire pit.  There are a couple of ways that you can accomplish this.  One is to build your own fire pit.  It can be as simple as a hole in the ground, or it can be as dramatic as a large stonework above the ground, complete with natural gas plumbed into it with an elective starter.

Read More→

Originally posted 2009-09-23 14:26:30. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Apr
27

Which Hostas Are Sun Tolerant?

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By:Jerry Van Der KolkWhy we garden....Hosta August Moon
Although hosta plants are mainly known for their love of shade there are many varieties that are sun tolerant. It used to be that these were mainly the hosta varieties with gold leaves but more hybrids are being developed every year that allow the beautiful hosta plant to tolerate more sunshine. In this article we will discuss some Hosta varieties that are known to be sun tolerant.

Hosta August Moon is an old time favorite sun tolerant hosta that grows well in almost any climate. The leaves start out as broad flat swords and turn into large corrugated golden slats by the end of the summer. The tiny flowers are a pale lavender color.

Another popular gold hosta is Gold Regal. This plant performs well in direct sunlight and is topped with a showy bouquet of lavender flowers during July.

Krossa Regal is a upright creamy blue hosta which can grow almost anywhere. This hosta forms a vaselike mound of foliage topped with very tall flower scapes during the summer. Krossa Regal is very popular due to its dependability and elegant appearance.

Hosta Regal Splendor is basically a Krossa Regal with a creamy golden margin! This sun tolerant sport of Krossa Regal displays the same growth habits but adds a twist of color. Both of these varieties are fast growers and sure to please.

Sun Power starts out with chartreuse colors which slowly evolve into a bright golden hue. Leaves are more pointed than those of August Moon. Holds its color well through out the season.

Hosta Francee is a classic green hosta with white margins. It is a fast increaser which boasts clumps full of eyes within a few years. Excellent all purpose hosta great for filling large areas or creating dramatic borders in your landscape. It is a clean looking hosta which has a very nice growth habit.

Rascal is a harder to find gold hosta. A very subtle chartreuse margin is hard to see at first glance but offers a unique variegation pattern. It is a sport of Hosta Gold Regal.

These hostas are some of the best choices for your sunny planting locations. If you are new to hostas make sure you take a look at Krossa Regal and Regal Splendor. You can find these two varieties almost anywhere you shop for hostas. Low maintenance and healthy plant vigor make these 2 beginner favorites!

Even some of the sun tolerant hostas have minimum watering requirements if you are experiencing warmer than normal summer conditions. As a quick rule of thumb, just remember most gold hostas can tolerate more sun than other varieties.

Article Source: http://ArticleCrux.com

Jerry Van Der Kolk has been involved directly with the Horticulture Industry for over 20 years. He now devotes his time to growing hard-to-find hostas for hosta collectors via his popular website www.DirectSourceHostas.com.

Originally posted 2009-09-12 13:04:13. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Categories : Garden Decor
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Apr
27

Caring For Orchids

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

by Jan Hartman

Target
Photo by Thai Jasmine

Orchids are beautiful, exotic plants that are temperamental, but can be successfully grown indoors as a decorative houseplant Orchids are not that complicated and if you understand caring for orchids and their needs you can grow these exotic and beautiful plants

Orchids are beautiful, exotic plants that are temperamental, but can be successfully grown indoors as a decorative houseplant. Orchids are not that complicated and if you understand caring for orchids and their needs you can grow these exotic and beautiful plants. Read More→

Originally posted 2010-01-26 14:46:55. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Apr
27

Garden Note to Self:

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (3)

gardening,garden maintenance,garden work,garden tools,garden boots

Well, it’s that time of year again and fall is upon us. Everyone keeps asking me if I’m done gardening yet and I reply that no in fact things are getting pretty busy in the garden business right now. Believe it or not, I’m so busy right now that I threw out my back yesterday and spent the evening eating ibuprofen…ugh. And spent the morning with my chiropractor! And yes, I’m back in action!

Read More→

Originally posted 2009-10-27 13:25:28. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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You Flinch & I'm Gone!!
By William J. Hurst

Birds can be an important addition to any landscape. Selecting the best ornamental plants that help improve the habitat of your back yard should be chosen for features that provide birds with food and shelter.

Viburnums provide excellent food and shelter for bird habitats.
Viburnum tinus

Viburnums are attractive, versatile, adaptable shrubs for any landscape in which you want to improve your bird habitat.. They can be used as hedges or screens and in mixed perennial and shrub borders. They can stand alone as specimen plants or in clusters. They usually take the form of shrubs, but some species can become small ornamental trees. They range in size from the Dwarf American Cranberry at 2 feet tall by 2 feet wide, to the Siebold at over 15 feet tall.
Read More→

Originally posted 2009-06-05 07:15:43. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Categories : Garden Decor
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