Archive for Gardening

Apr
27

Weed Watch Spring 2009

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (2)

Alright people!  I’m not going to tip-toe around this important garden issue. Spring is coming and it’s time to start planning ahead for the weeds that are coming with it. The invasive ones are my biggest concern. And this spring I want you all to keep an eye out for HORSETAIL (Equisetum arvense).
horse tail weed
The first time you saw Horsetail you may have innocently thought to yourself…Hmmm that looks like an interesting plant. Maybe you even foolishly thought to add it to your garden! Oh such folly! Perhaps you are one of those crazy gardeners like my father who likes to pit invasive against invasive *SIGH*

Well, if that is the case you may now unfortunately have it, and you probably want to get rid of it…LOL!  Good luck with that!  All I can recommend based on asking other gardeners, and from personal experience fighting it in the garden is to:  MULCH it, WEED it and SPRAY it with Round UP.

Why is this plant so difficult to get rid of?  Because it has SPORES people!  We are talking invisible microscopic prehistoric, grows in volcano SPORES.  So I would not ignore it if it appears…Pull it out…Pull it out….Pull it out! Luckily it pulls easily, except you are not going to get the entire root, as it lies like 6 feet underground akin to some kind of alien mother ship…Lurking …

What should you do? It would seem the thing to do is to make your garden less like a volcan0 and more like a jungle.  So fertilize, enrich the soil, mulch, and weed. I have found that you can plant taller plants near it to hide it and try to choke it out. Maybe my father’s method of invasive vs. invasive isn’t so far off the mark-No! Avoid invasives!  Try NATIVE (which sometimes behave a bit invasive if you ask me-which you didn’t)

Well, enough said for the moment. GartenGrl out.

Originally posted 2009-02-04 15:22:03. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Apr
27

Bird Watching Basics

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

by:Albreht Moy

Bird watching or birding is a very popular hobby that includes the observation and study of birds.Because visual observation of birds is complemented with auditory observation, the term “birding” is more accurate. Birding is the second most popular outdoor activity in America, second only to gardening as the number-one recreation.

For many people bird watching is an opportunity to feel close to nature. They also enjoy the relaxation and peacefulness by watching birds.Some birders,however,will travel long distances just to see a rare bird. These birders are known as twitchers. Twitching is popular in Britain and several other European countries.

Most birders start out by watching and attracting birds to their own back yards.Bird feeding can benefit birds and also provide great bird watching.You can attract a variety of interesting birds to your yard by selecting and offering the right kinds of food. The common types of food offered in bird feeding are seeds,nectar,suet and fruit.Early morning is the best time for bird watching since many birds are then searching most actively for food.

Once you start feeding birds, you’ll probably want to identify who is coming to visit. Equipment used for birding includes binoculars,a blank notebook, and one or more good field guides.

Field guides are books with pictures and descriptions of the birds. A field guide shows birds of just one country, or one region of a country, or one habitat.

Binoculars are described by two numbers: 8×32 for example. The first number tells you the magnification power of the binoculars. The second tells you the size of the objective lens at the end of the binoculars in millimeters. Most bird watchers think that 7 or 8 power is about right for most birding.

The next step is to broaden your birding experience beyond your own back yard. Plan a trip to a bird sanctuary, national park and other locations where you can see birds in large numbers. Wherever you go,never harm the birds and always respect other birders.

And don’t forget to join a local birding club. Clubs organize field trips,show films of good bird watching destinations and some of them are involved in local environmental projects. Also visit your local library and check out books on birds and ornithology.

Source: Articlecity.com

Originally posted 2010-02-07 14:04:37. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Family
Photo by Eva the Weaver
By James W Shaw
Garden farmers nowadays are very fond of using red worms for their organic garden. This is because of the red worms’ ability to convert organic material into compost, a substance that is beneficial to garden farms. While it is important for garden farmers to understand what these red worms need to be healthy and productive, it is also important to understand how their body works and how they digest their food and produce the worm castings that garden farmers use to cultivate their farms.

Red worms are also called red wigglers because of their reaction to being touched. Usually when red wigglers are handled, their natural reaction is to wriggle about, thus the name red wigglers. Red wigglers are manure type worms. This means that they will consume almost any form of organic material. They belong to the family Lumbricidae and they are one of the most popular worms in commercial production today. This is largely due to their popularity among garden farmers. Farmers prefer worms over earthworms for the reason that they are more effective at converting organic material into worm castings than earthworms. Read More→

Originally posted 2010-02-25 14:33:48. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Categories : Gardening, Landscaping, Tips
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Apr
27

Caring For Orchids

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

by Jan Hartman

Target
Photo by Thai Jasmine

Orchids are beautiful, exotic plants that are temperamental, but can be successfully grown indoors as a decorative houseplant Orchids are not that complicated and if you understand caring for orchids and their needs you can grow these exotic and beautiful plants

Orchids are beautiful, exotic plants that are temperamental, but can be successfully grown indoors as a decorative houseplant. Orchids are not that complicated and if you understand caring for orchids and their needs you can grow these exotic and beautiful plants. Read More→

Originally posted 2010-01-26 14:46:55. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Apr
27

Gardening With Ferns

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Dandelion Flower In Fern Trees

by: Jena Luthovski

Homeowners with wooded backyards choose ferns for their attractive undergrowth. There are many assortments to choose from. Thousands of varieties of ferns can be found all over the globe. Sizes range from a few inches to as much as 60-feet-tall.

Fern plants thrive and grow in woodlands all over the United States. These eye-catching plants are just as comfortable in the shaded areas of the splendor in the yard. You can place them in areas of little or even no direct sunlight, where little else will cultivate and grow.

It’s mostly up to you when it comes to flower garden design. It’s definitely important to do your best job in soil preparation as you carefully match certain plants to the location. Ignoring these principles will only result in a disheartening, time-consuming experience.

The aesthetics are simply of a personal preference. A formal appearance, for example, with plants in orderly garden planting and straight edged beds of fern may be your cup of tea. Maybe you’d be more content with an even more natural appearance with uneven plant clumps and extensive curves.

Established fern plants are simple to cultivate. They are versatile, as well—you can plant them singly or in clusters. You can use them as border edgings, along wooded regions, alongside the front of your house and in rock gardens. You can even try them in containers and use them as indoor houseplants.

While there may be thousands of assortments of ferns, several are on their way to becoming endangered species.

Some ferns are poisonous, so unless you know the variety you have is absolutely safe, it’s advisable to keep children and pets away from these ferns.

Ferns, not unlike mushrooms, produce spores. Spores develop on the underside of the leaves, as millions are produced. Only a few successfully land in a place that’s suitable to nurture, take root and cultivate. Ferns also grow by scattering their underground roots.

Ferns plants grow rather slowly. Established plants live for years, as most people buy ferns from garden nurseries or even on the Internet.

You can select a location with partial to full shade. Ferns like soil that is fertile in organic matter. You can add plenty compost at time of planting. It’s suggested that you keep the soil moist at all times.

Established fern plants should bloom for years with little or no attention. It’s wise to mulch around the plants each spring season to help preserve moisture, and to reload organic matter around the plant. Finally, let the plant cultivate naturally, once you remove dead or wilted fronds.

Photo courtesy of Flickr and www.vitalygman.com

Originally posted 2009-05-20 07:15:13. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Categories : Gardening
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Apr
27

Garden Note to Self:

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (3)

gardening,garden maintenance,garden work,garden tools,garden boots

Well, it’s that time of year again and fall is upon us. Everyone keeps asking me if I’m done gardening yet and I reply that no in fact things are getting pretty busy in the garden business right now. Believe it or not, I’m so busy right now that I threw out my back yesterday and spent the evening eating ibuprofen…ugh. And spent the morning with my chiropractor! And yes, I’m back in action!

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Originally posted 2009-10-27 13:25:28. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Butterfly Garden
By: Mary Hanna

With the huge growth that many cities and towns are experiencing we see the dwindling of Natural Meadows. With the absence of natural meadows, the habitat for butterflies, birds and other wildlife are dwindling too. Luckily butterflies are easily enticed back if you plant a garden where the caterpillar (pupa stage) has plants to eat and the butterfly has flowers to sip nectar. Butterfly gardens are easy to plant and will give you and your family a chance to see butterflies in their natural habitat.

The basics are an open space with tons of sunshine and a shield from wind. Pick a site with lots of sunlight with a few rocks or stones that can heat up on which the butterflies can bask in the afternoon sun. Try to place your garden near hedges or shrubs that will help shield them from the strong winds. If it is too windy, the butterflies won’t stay around for long. The hedge or shrub could become food for the caterpillar. You can find out what the caterpillar likes best from your Nursery Garden Center. Butterflies love mud puddles where they can drink the water and soak up minerals. A patch of damp soil will make them happy. Most important of all is that the garden be pesticide free. Many people like to use pesticides to chase away unwanted pests, unfortunately it will chase away your butterflies too. Put your butterfly garden in a corner where there will be no chemical pesticides used. Better still, ask your Garden Center about organic gardening.

Flowers with nectar are a must for a butterfly garden. When planting these nectar sources try to put in plants that will provide flowers throughout the growing season since these are the source of food for the butterflies. Don’t forget shrubs and wildflowers. Roses, geraniums and lilies have no nectar so plant them somewhere else. Keep your garden diversified to attract the most number of butterflies. Another component for the garden is a source for larva food. The caterpillar needs food to grow into a butterfly. If there is no food supply they will die. Plant some herbs for both of you. They like dill, fennel, and parsley on the menu. What they don’t eat you can harvest for cooking with fresh herbs.

You could also plant a butterfly site in garden containers. Buy some pretty pots and plant them with flowers that have a wonderful scent as well as bright beautiful colors (available at your Garden Center). Petunias, daylilies or sweet alyssum will do the trick. Of course the butterfly bushes are a natural, or plant some hanging baskets with Impatients (you’ll need some shade here).

Some gardeners like to make there own feeder and solution. And it is simple to do. Put 4 parts water to 1 part sugar in a pot and boil it until the sugar dissolves. Let it cool. Get a shallow garden container, saturate a paper towel with the solution and place it the garden container. Put a stone in the garden container so the butterflies have a place to perch while they are feeding.

Get the kids interested. Have them keep a journal of each of the different species that visit your butterfly garden. Let them look up the butterflies on the computer to learn all about each particular butterfly and it becomes not only fun, but a learning experience also.caterpillar

Since there are so many growing zones in the United States you will want to talk with your Nursery Center for suggestions of what plants to use for attracting butterflies in your particular zone.

There is an old American Indian Legend about butterflies: “To have a wish come true you must capture a butterfly. Whisper to the butterfly what your wish is and then set it free. This little messenger will take your wish to the Great Spirit and it will come true.” What a great legend.

Copyright 2005 By Mary Hanna

Photo:Butterfly Garden by Krazy Yak, on Flickr

Originally posted 2009-05-27 07:26:06. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Apr
27

Garden Room Boundaries…

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (1)

grandmothers....Garden Room Boundaries…
By Gordon Goh

The areas of your landscape can be divided into several sections and areas, which are also known as garden rooms. Garden rooms are spaces where you plant, grow, and display different ideas in gardening in various creative methods. One garden room could be a rose garden, while another could include the use of a water garden, while still another garden room in your landscape could include the use of just purple flowers. Garden rooms are your creation, and only limited to your imagination.
To create the rooms in your landscape where you can be both different and creative you need to actually create some type of walls in your gardens. The walls in your gardens are going to be grown from other larger types of plants. Living fences are one ‘way’ that you can create garden rooms.

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Originally posted 2009-07-31 08:49:54. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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I always hear people say they don’t have a green thumb. This is of course very silly thinking. When you are building and planning a garden you simply need to do a tiny bit of research. A successful garden is about 80 percent choosing the right plant for the right spot. Frankly some spots are like the surface of the moon, nothing will grow there. Find an alternative: try a rock garden. But research first.
cactii
If you have a giant Maple and nothing grows under it. You may need to create a raised bed. But some research would tell you not deeper than two inches, as anything more may kill the tree.

Don’t plant Rododendrums in a sunny spot that is solid clay. They just won’t really grow well. They would be happier under some pine trees in some nice acidic and loamy soil.

Got a spot that is smoking hot and dry? Don’t try to plant a rose garden there…unless you want it to look terrible. Try some Sedum, Cone Flower, Oriental Lillies, Butterfly Weed, Ornamental Grass and maybe a double knock-out rose might be O.K. if you get it some water a few times a week. They kind of thrive on neglect.

A little research goes a long ways to creating a successful and thriving garden.

Visit my other blog GartenGrl for some other ideas I have about gardening.

Originally posted 2009-03-29 17:13:01. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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By Scott M. Free and Nickolie Allen Greer
A Summer Garden Scene from Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire
Photo by UGArdener

Creating a walkway or path for your garden, flowerbed or lawn is a superb way of adding a glorious touch to the outdoor environment. There are innumerable options from where you can make a choice. Quite a few options have been mentioned below; let’s take a look at them:

• Basic Brick Pathway: The first thing that comes into our mind before creating walkways or paths is bricks. Using bricks you can give any desired shape to your path. In simple words, using bricks you can create several paths such as winding, meandering as well as narrow.

What’s more interesting is that bricks are available in various patterns and designs. You may even choose whether you desire to set the path in concrete or sand. Almost all people prefer opting for a concrete base!

Read More→

Originally posted 2010-03-03 14:51:33. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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