Archive for Tips

written by Rebecca Rambal

Poppy in a garden
Photo by Leonard John Matthews

When you think of Feng Shui, you mainly associate it with the home or the office, rearranging the furniture and surrounding yourself with objects that attract good luck. However it is not only indoors that can be designed using Feng Shui. You can also use it to create the perfect garden environment.

If a garden is part of your property, Feng Shui should be incorporated into it. That will really help to bring you the best results. We all like our gardens to look impressive and beautiful. It allows us to appreciate our environment a lot more and it helps to release positive energy that helps us flourish. Feng Shui gives us the tools needed to create the most positive outside environment and the best part is that you don’t need a huge garden to use Feng Shui arrangements.

Incorporating Feng Shui into the Garden

~ Orange Tree ~
Photo by ViaMoi

One of the main factors that you have to take into account when it comes to Feng Shui is that clutter is always a bad thing. This also applies to the garden. If you have a lot of clutter outside of your doorway you won’t attract good energy. Make sure that the entrance to your home looks welcoming and tidy. Also make sure you clean up once Winter is gone. The cold weather and the snow will cause leaves to stick to your lawn and in your flower beds. Once you have tidied everything away, you can truly start to incorporate Feng Shui into the garden.

If you want to plant trees in your garden, aim to plant them at the sides and around the back of your garden. Don’t plant them too close to your home as, although they are fantastic producers of positive energy, they can overshadow the home and look a little too imposing if placed too close. There should always be plenty of natural light shining into your home, so don’t place anything in the garden that will block out the light. Read More→

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Apr
27

Relief For Mosquito Bites

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (1)

this sucked (bug bites)We got this in a recent email and thought it would be a great “re”post…


Q: Working in my garden in the evening, I end up covered in bug bites. What can I do to relieve the inflammation?

Dr. Wright: One of the most effective treatments for mosquito bites (or other bug bites) is a paste made of any of the digestive enzymes — pancreatin, bromelain, or papain.

These enzymes come in tablet, capsule, or powder form and are available in any natural food store. The powder form is ready to be mixed, but tablets can be crushed and capsules emptied. Then, combine the resulting powder with as little water as necessary to make a paste. The paste should be applied directly to the bite and reapplied as needed until swelling has reduced.

It’s important to keep in mind, though, that while the enzyme paste is useful against the local swelling and inflammation from bug bites, it won’t treat an infection or allergic reaction brought on by them.Momentos antes de morir aplastado

Originally posted 2009-07-27 17:09:40. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Happy Spring Everyone! Here in Michigan the daffodils and forsythia are blooming and the peonies are pushing out of the grown like gangbusters! So as far as I’m concerned it’s time to get off the couch and get to work in the garden. With that in mind I have made a small list that I am calling:
Spring Garden Do and Don’t List
Forsythia has Sprung!
Photo by seeks2dream

  • Do clean out some of the leaves and brush that littered your beds over the winter
  • Don’t mangle your plants while you do this and don’t over do the clean-up as leaf debris will enrich the soil
  • Do trim your spirea, rose of sharon(you can really hack it back now),butterfly bush, hydrangea arborescence(white hydrangeas), hydrangea paniculata(tree form hydrangeas)
  • Don’t trim your pink or blue hydrangea macrophyllas! They bloom on terminal bud from last year
  • Don’t trim you viburnum, lilac, forsythia(wait till May), or fruit trees Read More→

Originally posted 2010-04-09 10:02:25. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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By Scott M. Free and Nickolie Allen Greer
A Summer Garden Scene from Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire
Photo by UGArdener

Creating a walkway or path for your garden, flowerbed or lawn is a superb way of adding a glorious touch to the outdoor environment. There are innumerable options from where you can make a choice. Quite a few options have been mentioned below; let’s take a look at them:

• Basic Brick Pathway: The first thing that comes into our mind before creating walkways or paths is bricks. Using bricks you can give any desired shape to your path. In simple words, using bricks you can create several paths such as winding, meandering as well as narrow.

What’s more interesting is that bricks are available in various patterns and designs. You may even choose whether you desire to set the path in concrete or sand. Almost all people prefer opting for a concrete base!

Read More→

Originally posted 2010-03-03 14:51:33. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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by:MarigoldsOrnamental Cabbage, French Green Beans and Daylilies COOPER HILL

Gardeners growing vegetables find that companion planting provides many benefits, one of which is protection from garden pests. A major enemy of the carrot is the carrot fly, whereas the leek suffers from the onion fly and leek moth. Yet when leek and carrot live together in companionship, the strong and strangely different smell of the partner plant repels the insects so much that they do not even attempt to lay their eggs on the neighbor plant. They take off speedily to get away from the smell. This is why mixed plantings give better insect control than mono-culture, where many plants of the same type are planted together in row after row.
Read More→

Originally posted 2009-09-30 14:53:30. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Apr
27

Caring For Orchids

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

by Jan Hartman

Target
Photo by Thai Jasmine

Orchids are beautiful, exotic plants that are temperamental, but can be successfully grown indoors as a decorative houseplant Orchids are not that complicated and if you understand caring for orchids and their needs you can grow these exotic and beautiful plants

Orchids are beautiful, exotic plants that are temperamental, but can be successfully grown indoors as a decorative houseplant. Orchids are not that complicated and if you understand caring for orchids and their needs you can grow these exotic and beautiful plants. Read More→

Originally posted 2010-01-26 14:46:55. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Walnut tree
Photo by cizauskas
A few years ago I lived in an old victorian house in Ann Arbor, Michigan that had a handful of stately old 100 foot tall Walnut trees (juglans regia). I quickly discovered that there were a number of plants that simply died or started to die as soon as I planted them under that tree – petunias, peonies, roses, impatiens to name just an unfortunate few. I was beginning to think perhaps I was not as good a gardener as I thought myself to be.

After asking around a bit I discovered that walnut trees are considered a gardening challenge because there are a number of plants that simply can not survive under them. This is due to a poisonous substance that leaches from the walnut trees called juglone-I sure would not be eating any veggies or herbs grown near or under a walnut tree( I heard somewhere that it was an ingredient in rat poison many years ago…not sure if that is true or just some kind of urban legend). So if you have hanging plants under a giant and elegant tree that keep dying and you do not know why, try looking up to see if that tree is a walnut tree. If it is then that is one garden problem you can consider solved! Read More→

Originally posted 2009-12-16 16:57:36. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Apr
27

How to Grow Avocado

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

avocado shells and seeds
Photo by bionicteaching
by: Hans Dekker
Fruit gardening and vegetable gardening is a very exciting venture. Growing Avocado’s was one of the challenges I took on as a hobby fruit and vegetable gardener. When you are not an inhabitant of state with a tropical climate you can grow avocado’s in containers.

avocado seed
Photo by silencematters

So, if you’re a fan of the avocado, chances are you already know how to grow avocado plants. Although the avocado tree is a tropical plant that thrives only in zones 9, 10, and 11, many gardeners grow avocado plants indoors, they grow it as a houseplant. Avocado plants are typically started from the seed in the center of the fruit. Many gardeners begin their avocado plants by piercing the seed with toothpicks and then suspending it (pointed end up) over a glass, vase, or jar of water. You can keep the water sweet by adding some charcoal in the bottom of your container. In two to six weeks, if the seed germinates, you should have a young plant, ready to pot. However, not all avocado seeds will germinate in this way. If your seed hasn’t sprouted in six weeks, toss it out and try again. Read More→

Originally posted 2010-01-08 11:09:14. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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When I had you / Dok sam te imao
Photo by lepiaf.geo (better off slipping into blur)
In November in Michigan it is time to put your garden to sleep for the winter. There are perhaps three different approaches to this and each one has its advantages and disadvantages to consider.

The “tidy clean-up” basically cuts every plant-except woody herbs and shrubs- to with-in an inch of it’s life and removes every ounce of dead plant matter with-in a mile. This method looks very clean. Reminiscent of your living room after the maid service leaves. This technique will ensure that very few diseased leaves are left behind to infect next years plants.It may also help hinder the slug and pest population. The cons of this technique outweigh the pros, because by removing all plant matter you have also removed all the vital nutrients the decomposing plant matter provides. You have also removed the winter protection and that plant matter provides for roots. Which means that you will have to add expensive fertilizers and amendments to your garden to make up for this. More expensive and less healthy for your garden this technique is not the best approach to a healthy garden. Read More→

Originally posted 2009-12-03 15:47:47. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Pink Tops

by tmgallery

Ornamental Grasses are becoming extremely popular in low maintenance landscapes as a way to add beauty and color without a great deal of hard work in the garden. Another great way to implement ornamental grasses is for fall landscapes. Many ornamental grasses for fall landscapes will last throughout the fall and winter months and will add texture and form to any fall garden design. Keep in mind that most, but not all, ornamental grasses for fall landscapes can be grown in almost any type of soil and usually until temperatures reach the low to mid 40s overnight. All of the following ornamental grasses are excellent suggestions for most average fall landscapes, but for those living in extreme conditions, it is best to research these grasses before adding them to your fall landscape design.

Blue Oat Grass

Helictotrichon Sempervirens

Without a doubt, Blue Oat Grass is one of the most popular ornamental grasses for fall landscapes. The large, densely blue colored foliage is attractive year round, but also provides beautiful flowers from June to August. While Blue Oat Grass does well in most mild to moderate climate zones, it is also fairly drought tolerant, only needing water every 1-2 weeks. For these mild to moderate climate zones, Blue Oat Grass can also make a great wintRed Fountain Grasser landscape choice as well.

Fountain Grass
Another large ornamental grass, Fountain Grass is another favorite choice of gardeners who prefer ornamental grasses for fall landscapes. Fountain Grass produces beautiful green foliage through the year, but the grass turns a golden yellow in the fall, adding to your fall landscape. This large ornamental grass can reach anywhere from 1 to 3 feet at full maturity. Keep in mind that this is an excellent summer landscape choice as it also offers beautiful white to purple flowers that will last until early winter.

Big Bluestem
A beautiful, tall prairie-like ornamental grass, the Big Bluestem can reach up to 8 feet in height, so be very careful where this ornamental grass is planted. The Big Bluestem truly is one of the perfect ornamental grasses for fall landscapes as the flowers wait until late summer or early fall to bloom and the fall foliage is also a vibrant orange color. Throughout the rest of the year, the foliage remains a bluish-green. While it does not have much presence throughout the winter months, it will begin to grow in April and become beautiful again by the early summer months.

Feather Reed Grass
A wonderful, medium sized plant, growing 3 to 5 feet at total maturity, Feather Reed Grass is another favorite among ornamental grasses for fall landscapes. This is also a favorite year round plant that grows well in almost any climate zone, although it may grow smaller in extremely warm climate zones. Flowers will occur in the mid summer months, a white to red color and will change to a beige color in the fall and into the winter months. Keep in mind that the wonderful temperament of this plant means that it can withstand excessive watering, sun or even lots of shade.

Source: Free Articles

Originally posted 2009-08-19 15:19:19. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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