Archive for Gardening

Apr
27

How to Build a Rain Barrel

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

This is a great video from HGTV that takes you step by step on constructing a rain barrel. Rain barrels are a great way to use water wisely by watering your garden with free water collected from your roof instead of using the cold water from the hose.

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Originally posted 2009-06-23 14:25:14. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

-- Weather When Posted --

  • Temperature: 85°F;
  • Humidity: 44%;
  • Heat Index: 84°F;
  • Wind Chill: 85°F;
  • Pressure: 29.94 in.;

Categories : Gardening
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Color is definitly a *great* way to make your garden/landscaping stand out. It will also make your outdoors much happier and friendlier place to be!

I find it very helpful to take a picture(s) of the area (digital), then print them out on full size paper (in color;).

Then, take this picture(s) with you to your local nursery or garden center. Start looking around for things that grab your attention. Show your picture to a adviser or attendant and ask for suggestions. They will want to know about the direction of sun and hours of sunlight per area.

Read More→

Originally posted 2008-10-15 15:56:12. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Categories : Decorating Tips
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Here is a very informative and interesting video I found on you tube, I hope you enjoy this!

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To prune clematis, cut back the plant after the flowering is over to about a foot from the ground. Avoid trimming clematis more than one-third each year with tips from a sustainable gardener in this free video on gardening.

Originally posted 2009-05-04 06:00:57. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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  • Temperature: 44°F;
  • Humidity: 62%;
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  • Wind Chill: 40°F;
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Categories : Gardening
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Monarch Butterfly
by: Doug Green

Butterfly gardens require several things to be successful: plants, water, and the right gardening attitude.

We can easily create lists of plants that butterflies love. Consider planting Asters, Joe-Pye weed, Black-eyed Susans, Lantana, Butterfly Bush, Butterfly Weed, Liatris, Pentas, Coreopsis and Purple Coneflowers. These are gorgeous plants and butterflies will flock to them in large numbers.

Gardeners can easily provide water by soaking the ground in an area next to favorite plants or by having small dishes/birdbaths with water in the garden. By providing water, you’ll attract butterflies. If you have a small pond, lay a stick on the edge so one end is in the water and one end on the shore. This will provide an easy entrance way for both butterflies and frogs. It also looks more realistic than bare edged ponds.

And finally, we need to create a gardening aButterfly Bokehttitude that says that in order to get those gorgeous butterflies, we need to feed the caterpillars that hatch out to be butterflies. It is OK to plant specific plants these immature insects require and it is OK if they chew them up. You have to have food in your garden for all phases of this creature if you want to attract them. The tip is to plant the following plants at the back of the garden so you wont’ see the damage. Plant Wild Asters, Clover, Hollyhocks, Lupines, Mallows, Marigolds, Milkweed, Nettles and Thistles, Parsley, Passionflower (in baskets) Plantain, Snapdragons, Sorrel, Turtlehead and Violets.

About The Author

Doug Green, award winning garden author of 7 books, answers gardening questions in his free newsletter at http://www.gardening-tips-perennials.com.

Photo: Monarch Butterfly by Creativity+ Timothy K Hamilton, on Flickr

Originally posted 2009-05-15 13:43:16. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

-- Weather When Posted --

  • Temperature: 64°F;
  • Humidity: 51%;
  • Heat Index: 64°F;
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Categories : Gardening
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Apr
27

Building a Compost Bin

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

Composting should be an essential part of gardening. It is a way to recycle your yard and kitchen waste and reduce the volume of garbage needlessly sent to landfills for disposal. There are a variety of composting bins that can be purchased or built and this video is an example of using old wood pallets to create your own Read More→

Originally posted 2009-07-03 08:56:10. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

-- Weather When Posted --

  • Temperature: 61°F;
  • Humidity: 83%;
  • Heat Index: 61°F;
  • Wind Chill: 60°F;
  • Pressure: 30.02 in.;

Categories : Gardening
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Apr
27

Passion Vine Trellis

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

All kinds of great advice about different kinds of vines and what they can do for you and where you want to grow them. You can’t beat a vine that attracts butterflies, so sit back and enjoy!
–GartenGrl

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How to use a passion vine to provide food for birds and other wildlife and shade for your porch

Originally posted 2009-06-22 10:24:45. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

-- Weather When Posted --

  • Temperature: 74°F;
  • Humidity: 66%;
  • Heat Index: 76°F;
  • Wind Chill: 74°F;
  • Pressure: 29.89 in.;

Categories : Gardening
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Apr
16

Bravo Brave Gardener!

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (2)

Courage: a quality of spirit that enables you to face danger or pain without showing fear(1)

brave gardener,dangerous animals,garden jungle
Come spring as we begin our fearless foray into peoples messy untamed garden jungles; surrounded by piles of menacing dead branches, unsightly beds filled with brown and wilted vegetation, cracked and broken pots, old abandoned sharp tools left to rust lying in a grey and mucky menagerie-
We climb mountains of boulders which can be slippery and precarious, we forage streams of spring run-off and deep pooling water, we have to hack our way through dangerous raspberry patches, and we sometimes get mangled by sharp clawing rose vines. We clear giant tree branches, shovel mountains of mud, and haul piles of debris. It’s hard, back breaking work…and we do it!

We encounter wild animals on land; squirrels, chipmunks, salamanders….the occasional worm. Cougars! Don’t laugh, it’s true…One can never be too careful, I say to myself when fear creeps up my spine on that rare occasion that I find myself no longer in the formal garden but suddenly in the woods…out back…yep, scary stuff.

And don’t forget to keep an eye on the sky! Many a gardener has been attacked from above by angry and venomous wasps. I myself have had to fight and claw off an angry swarm of stinging mud daubers. My only salvation was to dive head long into the swimming pool. “I don’t believe it!”, you say. Well, believe it! It’s a mad jungle out there. And the only thing between you and that beautiful garden is a BRAVE gardener!

And brave is what we are. We are Garden Hero’s, come to save the day! We accept our accolades with a humble sense of “just doing our job, mam, sir!” “All in a days work!” and then we quietly return the job at hand.

1. Definition of courage courtesy of www.google.com/search

Originally posted 2009-02-13 17:47:33. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

-- Weather When Posted --

  • Temperature: 33°F;
  • Humidity: 69%;
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  • Wind Chill: 23°F;
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Categories : Gardening, Landscaping
Comments (2)

One of the problems that a new northern landscape may encounter is a lack of plant material to fill the landscape with. A new garden can be a little sparse sometimes as you wait for the young plants to mature-which can take about three years when you live in a northern climate. So instead of looking at mulch for the next three years, get pro-active and plant some ground cover! And a lot of it. Use ground cover to help fill in between plants, fountains and garden decor, or around stepping stones.
Before you start planting just anything you need to choose your ground cover based on the light, water, and traffic conditions in your garden. Here are just a few of the many ground cover ideas a gardener in a northern climate garden might want tHelluhnoðri
Photo by zophonias
o consider.

If you have a sunny garden you might want to consider planting some sedum. It comes in many different foliage and flower colors ranging from yellow and white and bright green to pink and burgundy. Sedum is great for a garden that does not receive a lot of water as it is drought tolerant and actually thrives in poor soil conditions. It is often used on a lot of those new fangled green roof tops to give you an idea of what kind of environment it likes. Hot, hot and hot! It is not a great ground cover choice if there is going to be a lot of foot traffic, though. Read More→

Originally posted 2010-01-02 11:51:55. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

I think Yolanda’s videos have good and accurate garden information that get’s right to the point. Here she explains pruning hydrangeas, which as you probably know can be a little confusing…
–GartenGrl

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Prune hydrangeas after they have finished blooming in the fall by trimming the branches back one-third each year. Avoid pruning hydrangeas back past the little tips with the buds by considering ins…

Originally posted 2009-05-11 09:18:41. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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  • Humidity: 76%;
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Categories : Gardening
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Author: nlwest21
Poison ivy – also best-known as toxicodendron radicans – is a kind of plant that is regarded to be apart of the Anacardiaceae family. Many of us learned about this plant when we were children and were taught to keep as far away from it as we possibly could. Those of us who did not listen to the rule soon discovered about the rash that it would induce and which would leave us in pain for a week.  This plant is not really an ivy – but is instead a wooden vine that can to develop the content urushiol. This is a kind of skin irritant that causes the rash to come out on anyone who tries to feel it. This rash can make the person incredibly itchy. It must be dealt with unique creams.  You will be able to recognize the poison ivy plant by its common ‘leaves of three’. All of the blades are almond shaped and is the one feature that truly separates it from different plants. The plant will likewise have berries that are a gray-white color and which are consumed by birds during the winter months.  The younger plants will have light green leaves and as they mature this color will turn into a dark green. The blades are between 3 to 12 centimeters long and will have a few teeth on the edges of it. Along the vine you will observe that the leaves are grown clustered together.   These plants will never be discovered growing in desert or arid regions. Rather they are ofttimes developing in the woody areas. This is why they are oftentimes tricky to spot because they have the ability to merge in well with the plants that surround them.  People find it very tricky to do away with the  poison ivy plant  because it has the power to produce both sexually and vegetatively. The vines will push out adventitious roots or the plant will plainly spread from the root crowns. The seeds has the ability to be distributed by the animals in the area after they have consumed parts of it and then had it come out of their system.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/gardening-articles/best-way-to-identify-poison-ivy-894625.html

About the Author:
Knowing everything you can about  Poison Ivy  will help you to  Treat  it properly.

Photograph courtesy of Charles M. Wrenn III at www.morguefile.com

Originally posted 2009-04-30 14:05:07. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

-- Weather When Posted --

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Categories : Gardening
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