Archive for Native Plants

When I had you / Dok sam te imao
Photo by lepiaf.geo (better off slipping into blur)
In November in Michigan it is time to put your garden to sleep for the winter. There are perhaps three different approaches to this and each one has its advantages and disadvantages to consider.

The “tidy clean-up” basically cuts every plant-except woody herbs and shrubs- to with-in an inch of it’s life and removes every ounce of dead plant matter with-in a mile. This method looks very clean. Reminiscent of your living room after the maid service leaves. This technique will ensure that very few diseased leaves are left behind to infect next years plants.It may also help hinder the slug and pest population. The cons of this technique outweigh the pros, because by removing all plant matter you have also removed all the vital nutrients the decomposing plant matter provides. You have also removed the winter protection and that plant matter provides for roots. Which means that you will have to add expensive fertilizers and amendments to your garden to make up for this. More expensive and less healthy for your garden this technique is not the best approach to a healthy garden. Read More→

Originally posted 2009-12-03 15:47:47. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Native Plants for balance

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

I am a big fan of native plant gardening…which helps to develope and restore the natural ecosystem of where you live…so remember to include a few native plants into your landscape! Here is an awesome video that explains why native plant gardening is important and a good thing to do.

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Using native plants to restore balance to the ecosystem in your backyard and attract wildlife

Originally posted 2009-05-25 09:34:30. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Categories : Landscaping
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Native Plants In Late Summer

Posted by: CoolGardenThings | Comments (0)

Here is another great video that discussed some excellent native plant choices that you can add to your native plant garden.


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And then of course there’s the Purple Cone Flower just finishing up this time of the year but nonetheless spectacular. And just look at this exuberant display of Black-Eyed Susans. It just seems like the more you turn up the heat, the better they perform. These showy flowers are particularly suited as companions to many of the native grasses which move so gracefully in the wind. .

Originally posted 2009-06-01 07:00:39. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Categories : Garden Decor, Gardening
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It is winter. The ground is frozen. What should a gardener do? The only thing left for an obsessed gardener to do is make a wish list of things to plant in the summer. Some plants that should be on any northern gardeners wish list are these three midwest natives: Coneflower, Black-eyed Susans, and False Indigo. Why should you care that they are natives? Any gardener worth their dirt knows that choosing native plants for your garden saves water, time, money and helps the environment by providing food for local wildlife.

Photo by melolou
Coneflower or echinacea is a native plant that is a wonderful contribution to any garden. As a flower it is quite simply pretty in pink and as a native it provides food for the wild life that visits your garden. It makes a great companion plant with many grasses and roses and sedum. It also has roots that can survive in drought weather and clay soil. It will reseed itself and spread in a friendly and non aggressive manner. It should certainly be at the top of any gardeners to plant list. Read More→

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