Archive for Shrubs

When I had you / Dok sam te imao
Photo by lepiaf.geo (better off slipping into blur)
In November in Michigan it is time to put your garden to sleep for the winter. There are perhaps three different approaches to this and each one has its advantages and disadvantages to consider.

The “tidy clean-up” basically cuts every plant-except woody herbs and shrubs- to with-in an inch of it’s life and removes every ounce of dead plant matter with-in a mile. This method looks very clean. Reminiscent of your living room after the maid service leaves. This technique will ensure that very few diseased leaves are left behind to infect next years plants.It may also help hinder the slug and pest population. The cons of this technique outweigh the pros, because by removing all plant matter you have also removed all the vital nutrients the decomposing plant matter provides. You have also removed the winter protection and that plant matter provides for roots. Which means that you will have to add expensive fertilizers and amendments to your garden to make up for this. More expensive and less healthy for your garden this technique is not the best approach to a healthy garden. Read More→

Originally posted 2009-12-03 15:47:47. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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You Flinch & I'm Gone!!
By William J. Hurst

Birds can be an important addition to any landscape. Selecting the best ornamental plants that help improve the habitat of your back yard should be chosen for features that provide birds with food and shelter.

Viburnums provide excellent food and shelter for bird habitats.
Viburnum tinus

Viburnums are attractive, versatile, adaptable shrubs for any landscape in which you want to improve your bird habitat.. They can be used as hedges or screens and in mixed perennial and shrub borders. They can stand alone as specimen plants or in clusters. They usually take the form of shrubs, but some species can become small ornamental trees. They range in size from the Dwarf American Cranberry at 2 feet tall by 2 feet wide, to the Siebold at over 15 feet tall.
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Originally posted 2009-06-05 07:15:43. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Categories : Garden Decor
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Walnut tree
Photo by cizauskas
A few years ago I lived in an old victorian house in Ann Arbor, Michigan that had a handful of stately old 100 foot tall Walnut trees (juglans regia). I quickly discovered that there were a number of plants that simply died or started to die as soon as I planted them under that tree – petunias, peonies, roses, impatiens to name just an unfortunate few. I was beginning to think perhaps I was not as good a gardener as I thought myself to be.

After asking around a bit I discovered that walnut trees are considered a gardening challenge because there are a number of plants that simply can not survive under them. This is due to a poisonous substance that leaches from the walnut trees called juglone-I sure would not be eating any veggies or herbs grown near or under a walnut tree( I heard somewhere that it was an ingredient in rat poison many years ago…not sure if that is true or just some kind of urban legend). So if you have hanging plants under a giant and elegant tree that keep dying and you do not know why, try looking up to see if that tree is a walnut tree. If it is then that is one garden problem you can consider solved! Read More→

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